2015 Shasta Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation, PO Box 1173, Anderson, CA  96007-1173,  530 365-WILD (365-9453)
Did You Find An Injured or Distressed Animal? The Shasta Wildlife Rescue Hot Line for Shasta County, California is: 530 365-WILD (365-9453) If we cannot accept the animal in question we can refer you to the appropriate wildlife expert, agency or organization. Our trained staff can also help you decide whether or not the animal needs rescue or should be left in the wild. For more information on phone hours and staffing see our About Us web page. For fawns Contact: Haven Humane Society Phone: 530 241-1653 They have a 24 hour phone monitor system at this number. For large animals, such as bears or mountain lions Contact: California Department of Fish and Wildlife - Region 1  Phone: 530 225-2300 Note that the California Department of Fish and Game has recently changed its name and is now the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. For all wildlife rescues in Tehama County Contact: Tehama Wild Care Phone: 530 347-1687 Tehama Wild Care Facebook page Also contact them for all bat and baby skunk rescues in both Shasta County and Tehama County. For some additional helpful information on bats and rabies, please see our Helpful Information on Wildlife Rescue web page. For all other animals Shasta Wildlife Rescues rehabilitation permit, which is issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, only allows us to provide rehabilitative care to certain non-domestic animals. We cannot accept any domestic animals including domestic birds (parakeets, lovebirds, etc.). We also cannot accept farm animals, venomous reptiles or exotic animals. If you need assistance with these animals go to our Domestic, Farm and Exotic Animals web page for links to agencies and organizations that may be able to help you. If you are not in Shasta or Tehama County Try the California Department of Fish and Wildlife - Wildlife Rehabilitation Facilities web page which lists facilities in California. For other states and countries a good resource is the Wildlife Rehabilitation Information Directory. Finally, check our Links web page for additional wildlife rehabilitator directories. Should You Remove the Animal from the Wild? You should try to educate yourself to ascertain whether or not an animal in distress needs rescue or should be left alone in the wild. Unless the situation is urgent, a quick phone call to a wildlife expert can make the difference in the ultimate outcome of the rescue. In most instances it is preferable to leave the animal where it was found. We often receive animals for rescue that would have had a better chance for survival if left alone in the wild. For more information on this and other topics about helping and rescuing wildlife, please see our Helpful Information on Wildlife Rescue web page.
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